Archive for the ‘Dallas Computer Repair’ Category

Windows 8!

Monday, October 25th, 2010

In its most concrete comments yet about the next version of Windows, Microsoft said in a blog post on its Dutch Web site that Windows 8 is about two years from hitting the market.

Microsoft is working on the next version of Windows, the blog says in Dutch, but it will be about two years before Windows 8 is on the market.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13860_3-20020544-56.html?tag=topTechContentWrap;editorPicks#ixzz13PVmYs5u

Microsoft Bug Fixed

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

Microsoft says it has a fix for a bug that was keeping Office 2003 users from being able to access some rights-managed files.
The bug, which cropped up on Friday, meant that users of Office 2003 were unable to access files protected using Microsoft’s rights management service (RMS) technology.

Microsoft posted a software download known as a “hotfix” on Saturday that it says resolves the issue.
“The issue of the inability to open Office 2003 documents protected with RMS has now been resolved with a hotfix,” Microsoft said in a short statement on its Office sustained engineering blog.

Antivirus Software that won’t slow you down.

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

The fastest, most effective technology available to protect you from viruses and spyware without slowing you down while you work or play. ESET NOD32 Antivirus 4 ThreatSense scanner is even smarter and faster, while adding removable media security, new diagnostic and recovery tools, and more advanced heuristics.

Upgrading XP to Windows 7

Thursday, October 29th, 2009
Because you can’t upgrade over XP, there are some steps you’ll want to take before you install Windows 7 to make the process easier. This game plan also works if you plan to do a clean or custom install on a Windows Vista system.
* Make an inventory of the software you’ll want to reinstall on Windows 7. This may be a good time to do some housecleaning. Identify the programs you really need and plan to keep them, and cast off those you don’t.
* Download, install and run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor at www.microsoft.com/windows/windows-7/get/upgrade-advisor.aspx. This will scan your PC and point out compatibility issues with hardware and software. You may have software that won’t run on Windows 7, and you’ll need to upgrade to a newer version of that program, or obtain a patch if available.
* Download and save to a CD, DVD or external drive any software patches you’ll need. Do the same for any Windows 7 drivers that are available for your key hardware, video and audio adapters, printers, mice, keyboards, scanners, etc.
* Research and identify the security software you’ll want to install. Don’t expect the antivirus or antispyware programs you bought two years ago to work on Windows 7. Microsoft has a Web page that lists developers with compatible security titles at www.microsoft.com/windows/antivirus-partners/windows-7.aspx.
* Make a backup of your documents, music, videos and photos, to an external drive. Check the help files for your e-mail program to see how to export your mail folders, then save those to the external drive as well. If you’re really cautious, make a disk image of your entire system using software such as Acronis TrueImage, Norton Ghost or Norton Save & Restore so you can recover your Windows XP setup in case something goes horribly wrong.
* Check the system requirements for Windows 7 to see if your PC is powerful enough. Although Microsoft says 1 GB of RAM will work with the 32-bit version, I’d recommend you have at least double that. Install your RAM or any hardware upgrades before you install Windows 7.
* Once you have Windows 7, you can start the installer from within XP. It will do additional compatibility checks, then reboot the system to begin the installation. I’d recommend doing the Custom install, because it does provide a secondary copy of your data files.
* When the installation is complete, install the latest Windows 7 drivers, then the antivirus software you’ve selected and let it update its malware definitions.
* Manually run Windows Update to check for any patches and fixes.
* Before you install any of your software, live with this installation for a while. Play around with Windows 7, learning its differences before you have to rely on it for real work. Give it a few days before installing your software, and copying data back to the hard drive.
Once your installation is the way you like it, consider using the Backup and Restore function in Windows 7 to make an image of your existing hard drive. You can use this later if you need to start over from scratch – and it will come in handy when Windows 8 rolls around in a few years!

Windows7 is a winner!

Monday, October 19th, 2009

After conducting an analysis of actual inventory data collected from more than 450,000 corporate PCs between November 2008 and August 2009, Softchoice (via ComputerWorld) has concluded that 88 percent of them meet the minimum system requirements to run Windows 7. The sample consisted of 248 individual organizations representing a wide range of industries from across the United States and Canada, including financial, health care, manufacturing, and education. In comparison, when Windows Vista was going to be released, Softchoice found that only 50 percent of corporate PCs were able to support the minimum system requirements.